Judges get a first look at the Hokonui Fashion Design entries


From left to right, Hokonui Fashion and Design Awards judges, Kathryn Wilson, designer and founder of Kathryn Wilson Footwear, James Dobson, designer and founder of Jimmy D, and Sara-Jane Duff, designer and owner of Lost and Led Astray, judging clothing in the schools' streetwear section, in Gore on Thursday.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

From left to right, Hokonui Fashion and Design Awards judges, Kathryn Wilson, designer and founder of Kathryn Wilson Footwear, James Dobson, designer and founder of Jimmy D, and Sara-Jane Duff, designer and owner of Lost and Led Astray, judging clothing in the schools’ streetwear section, in Gore on Thursday.

“Costs.” “Snazzy.” “Mmmm.” “Jazzy.” “Wow.”

If first impressions count, nominations for this year’s Hokonui Fashion Design Awards were a hit with the judges, who got to watch them for the first time on Thursday.

Auckland-based designers Kathryn Wilson, designer and founder of Kathryn Wilson Footwear, James Dobson, designer and founder of Jimmy D, and Sara-Jane Duff, designer and owner of Lost and Led Astray, spent the morning looking at the streetwear items. schools, and all said they were impressed with what they saw.

“There are some really amazing young talents and the quality of the applications is really high. There are incredible sewers, ”said Duff.

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The models dressed in all manner of materials were masked and marched to stand in front of the judges, one at a time, to have the clothes they wore judged on.

Dobson said it was pretty exciting because the judges felt like they were in the audience for the show and they never knew what the models were going to wear around the corner.

In some cases, they wanted to touch the fabrics, ask questions about the linings and the feel of wearing the clothes, or make suggestions on how the entries could be best worn on the runway.

Dobson said having a year off last year due to the Covid-19 pandemic could have had a positive impact on entrants.

“There is a lot of energy in the entrances. I’ve been in this industry for a long time and see things I’ve never seen before. ”

Hokonui <a class=Fashion and Design Awards judging clothing in the schools section in Gore on Thursday photographed model Laura Horton, 18, of Invercargill, left, and wardrobe assistant Barbara Ramsay.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Hokonui Fashion and Design Awards judging clothing in the schools section in Gore on Thursday photographed model Laura Horton, 18, of Invercargill, left, and wardrobe assistant Barbara Ramsay.

Wilson said the awards, now in their 32nd year, remain important to young designers, Wilson said.

“They are definitely recognized as exceptional – having an application here can prepare a designer for the next step in their career and help them be chosen to the next level,” she said.

“There are definitely designers here who will have a place in the industry, they have very strong ideas.”

The awards have been awarded since 1988 and have allowed amateur fashion designers to showcase their designs in front of well-known industry leaders.

In previous years, the jury included Karen Walker, Nic Blanchet, Francis Hooper, Trelise Cooper, Kate Sylvester, Liz Findlay, Doris Du Pont and Margi Robertson of NOM * d.

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Joseph E. Golightly