Christchurch designer wins Hokonui Fashion Design Awards in Gore

This year’s Hokonui Fashion Design Awards winning design stopped one of the judges in its tracks.

A collection by Christchurch-based designer Ari Terekhova won the Mataura Licensing Trust Award of Excellence at the Hokonui Fashion Design Awards, in addition to the Mackersey Properties Collections Award.

The awards, in their 32nd year, were held in Gore on Saturday night.

Winning the main category in the prizes was only part of an eventful Saturday night for Terekhova, an architect.

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It was the very first fashion event Terekhova had attended and after winning the early night open collections award, she thought she was done and went to Mosgiel to stay there before catching a flight from return at 8 am for Christchurch on Sunday.

“I was thrilled to win the collections award and thought that was it, I finished [for the night]”said Terekhova.

The collection of Ari Terekhova, from Christchurch, which won the Mataura Licensing Trust Award of Excellence at the Hokonui <a class=Fashion Design Awards in Gore on Saturday night.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Robyn Edie / Stuff

The collection of Ari Terekhova, from Christchurch, which won the Mataura Licensing Trust Award of Excellence at the Hokonui Fashion Design Awards in Gore on Saturday night.

Not realizing that she was in the running for the top prize, she and her husband left Gore around 11 p.m.

However, they took a wrong turn and drove 60 kilometers on the Queenstown Road before Terekhova thought something was wrong.

<a class=Designer Ari Terekhova, right, with models wearing the clothes that won her the Collections Award and the Award of Excellence.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Designer Ari Terekhova, right, with models wearing the clothes that won her the Collections Award and the Award of Excellence.

She checked her phone’s GPS and at the same time saw a missed call from Sheree McIntyre, Chair of the Awards Commission.

Returning the call, McIntyre asked her where she was and whether she had won the award for excellence.

“It was very exciting [to be told] … I didn’t expect it, “Terekhova said.

” I did not know [I could win it]. “

Christchurch designer Ella van Beynen won the Streetwear award.

Robyn edie

Christchurch designer Ella van Beynen won the Streetwear award.

During the conversation, Terekhova told McIntyre that she and her husband were lost, but after a few hints she was back on the right track.

Terekhova said her winning clothes were made from natural dyes. She wanted to showcase natural dyes at the event.

Entry from Una Adams, Gore, of the Nightlife section, winning the Heather Paterson Memorial Award for Best Designer in Southland.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Entry from Una Adams, Gore, of the Nightlife section, winning the Heather Paterson Memorial Award for Best Designer in Southland.

“I wanted to highlight natural dyes and show how resources can be used,” she said.

“Instead of using chemicals, I use something natural.

“Fashion is a platform. You have to make it sexy … salable in fashion for people to appreciate it.”

Entry from George Borrie, of Invercargill, who won the men's clothing section.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Entry from George Borrie, of Invercargill, who won the men’s clothing section.

Judge James Dobson, of label Jimmy D, said Terekhova’s three garments presented as a collection were innovative.

“They stopped me in my tracks. They had been carefully printed, the designer had made her own fabrics and the tailoring was amazing. ”

The designs were made of silk and merino, which he said “seemed to be the future of fashion.”

“We’re looking at a more ethical industry and this is a fashion design competition, not a dress art competition, so that fit the brief very well. “

The entry of Monica Toretto on the catwalk in the collections section.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

The entry of Monica Toretto on the catwalk in the collections section.

Sarah-Jane Duff, label of Lost and Led Astray, was also part of the jury.

She said the winning designs were beautifully created, performed well on the runway, and were timeless.

“What they have been able to create using a natural dyeing technique is amazing. “

The models paraded the catwalk in front of a sold-out crowd at the awards gala night, after a record crowd at the Strictly Design Awards night on Friday night.

Viv Tamblyn's winning garment in the nightlife section.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Viv Tamblyn’s winning garment in the nightlife section.

Masks were a feature of some models for the first time, a sign of the Covid-19 pandemic, and denim featured prominently on the runway in the recycled sections.

Registrations in the school sections also marched on Saturday evening, after the announcement of the winners on Friday.

The award for excellence in the schools section was won by Ruby Wells of St Matthews Collegiate, Masterton.

Entrance from Nan Walden, Wellington, who won the Gore District Council Auaha Award.

Robyn Edie / Stuff

Entrance from Nan Walden, Wellington, who won the Gore District Council Auaha Award.

Other winners:

  • Open Avant-Garde Prize: Cydney Rooy, Wellington
  • Open Streetwear Prize: Ella van Beynen, Christchurch
  • Open Collections Prize: Ari Terekhova, Christchurch
  • Open natural fiber: Anna de Boyett, Auckland
  • Open nightlife: Viv Tamblyn, Gore
  • Open Recycled: Madeline Mangos
  • Open Men’s Clothing: George Borrie, Invercargill
  • Best Fabric Use: Jane Boyle, ARA, Christchurch
  • Best Use of Wool: Viv Tamblyn, Gore
  • Clothing with the greatest commercial potential: Ella McIntosh, ARA, Christchurch
  • Auaha Prize: Nan Walden, Wellington
  • Southland’s Best Designer: Una Adams, Gore
  • Young Designer Award: Anna de Boyett, Whitecliffe College, Auckland


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Joseph E. Golightly